mobile videoSubscription, transactional or free streaming video services account for 42% of the time that adult video streamers spend in front of television screens at home, according to new video streaming habits research from Adobe Primetime and The Diffusion Group (TDG).

Subscription Video On Demand (SVOD) accounts for 65% of the time adult video streamers engage with OTT services via home television screens. Free streaming services (FVOD) account for 30% and transactional streaming services (TVOD) 5%, Adobe Primetime marketing director Campbell Foster highlights on Adobe’s Digital CMO blog.

¨Consumers’ video-streaming behavior has fundamentally changed the competitive landscape of the TV industry,¨ Foster elaborates. ¨Media companies now find themselves in a battle for attention, engagement, and audiences. To understand this competitive landscape better, we worked with The Diffusion Group to survey video streamers off all ages.¨

Video Streaming Habits

Drilling down into the SVOD category, Adobe Primetime and TDG found that 82% of adult video streamers subscribe to some type of online subscription video service. Netflix tops the list at 70% use, followed by Amazon Prime at 33% and Hulu Plus at 21%.

Corresponding highlights in the SVOD category include:

  • 88% of adult video streamers use free online video services.
  • YouTube is by far the most popular free online video service. It is used by 83% of adult video streamers. It is followed by Hulu at 23% and Crackle at 19%.

And for TVOD:

  • 34% of adult video streamers use a transactional streaming video service.
  • iTunes, Google Play, and Amazon Instant View are the top three transactional streaming video services.

The research partners also looked into TV Everywhere. Key takeaways included:

  • 17% of adult video streamers (who also subscribe to pay-TV) engage with their TV provider’s TV Everywhere app, while 12% engage with the TV Everywhere apps provided by TV networks. This is largely consistent with the most recent Adobe Digital Index Video Benchmark research.

Image courtesy of flickr user Kirill Kniazev.